Photo d'une nova fournie par la Nasa

A bizarre star produced the fastest nova on record

Novas are really peculiar phenomena. In fact, they are formed from two stars which suddenly explode while emitting bright light. A nova is able to shine so extremely brutal during many days. Recently a team American astronomers managed to observe the nova fastest ever recorded nowadays. So Professors Sumner Starrfield and Charles Woodward set up a research team to observe it.

They particularly wanted to understand why this nova is so different from others. In addition, astronomers have also sought to find in it answers to larger questions such as the star deaththe evolution of the universe or the chemistry of our solar system.

This event uncommon particularly marked them and attracted the attention of scientists around the world.

A nova is the result of the explosion of a star in the heart of a white dwarf.

Visible during a few more weeks, a nova is recognizable by the halo of light that surrounds it. It is notably created by a very dense core white dwarf and another accompanying star. The two stars are so close to each other that the white dwarf attracts matter of the little star.

Photo of a nova provided by NASA

However, this material heats up when falling on the surface of the white dwarf. A chain reaction then ensues which causes a strong explosion and releases considerable energy. Even if this sudden release of energy remains invisible, the high speed material projections in space appear as light.

The nova V1674 Hercules showed some really strange features

On June 12, 2021, the Nova V1674 Hercules intensely explodedbut its glow faded after only a few days. The nova bursts so brief are very rare and constitute a valuable subject of study. The previous V838 Herculis dates from 1991 and only lasted two or three days.

Also, the light and energy it emitted are really unusual. They have been pulsed like the sound of a bell reverberating every 501 seconds. The researchers noticed that the nova kept this oscillation for a year after its explosion.

SOURCE: PHYS

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