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Activision sues company for selling Call of Duty cheats

The American giant Activision has just initiated legal proceedings against a company that he accuses of creating and selling cheats for Call of Duty. The target company would charge up to nearly 140 euros for 90 days access to its codes.

Activision doesn’t really like cheaters, which we understood a little while ago with the announcement of massive bans and the deployment of a new security system supposed to hurt hackers.

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This week, the American publisher and developer did not return his jacket by suing a company suspected of creating and selling cheats for titles such as Call of Duty. The company in question, EngineOwning, is based in Germany.

A company would charge up to 140 euros for access to cheating on Call of Duty

The complaint accuses EngineOwning of being “Engaged in the development, sale, distribution, marketing and operation of a portfolio of cheats and malicious hacks for popular online multiplayer games including games [Call of Duty]”.

The cheats proposed by the German company would include in particular the automatic aiming, the automatic shooting as well as the localization of the opposing players. They would not be sold at retail but accessible for a given period. These cheats could be used for three days in exchange for 4.49 euros. And if you want to push the cork much further, until you end up with a bottle open for eternity, it is 139.99 euros that will be requested for a 90-day access.

Activision believes that these cheats have made “Suffer massive and irreparable damage to its business and reputation, and lose substantial income.” And to add:

“Because COD games are so popular, unscrupulous individuals and companies like [EngineOwning] frequently seek to exploit games for personal gain by selling cheats, hacks and other malware, knowing full well that they ruin the experience of other players and harm Activision. ”

And then in this way, Activision could possibly recover the shortfall of all these banned players who had, a priori, paid for their game.

Source: GamesIndustry.biz

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